Deviant Login Shop  Join deviantART for FREE Take the Tour
×

More from deviantART



Details

Submitted on
February 3, 2011
Link
Thumb

Stats

Views
60,763 (39 today)
Favourites
0
Comments
10
×
Fox Harvard is currently a US-based fashion & portrait photographer. Born in Tampa and raised in Sarasota, he's a native Floridian who currently resides in the Tampa Bay area. Fox began private art lessons in adolescence and went on to attend a private performing arts high school before proceeding to study Studio Arts & Painting at the University of South Florida. He attributes his present style to applying the same creative approach to photography as he did to painting. The majority of his work possesses an overtly uninhibited and cinematic flair, incorporating strong emotive and sentimental qualities that regardless of subject matter, seem to allude to a time not long forgotten. His work captures the undisguised beauty of the people he works with and simultaneously professes an undying love for elegance & sensuality.

Fox's dedication to constantly creating shows an almost obsessive nature that resonates in his imagery; his recent works are soon to be released in a collector's book from Editions du LIC, due out in hardback this summer. Recent exhibitions include shows at Feroce's in Lyon, France, and Ono Arte in Bologna, Italy. His commercial work can be seen online for clients such as HealiumHair.com, and his editorial pieces can continually be found in arts & fashion magazines such as Vogue Italia, Art Magazine Deutschland, Creem Magazine NY, Mint Magazine UK, Duemila Arts & Culture Magazine Italy, Remark Magazine, and Sex+Design.


Indifferemment du medium avec lequel j'ai toujours choisi de travailler, je suppose que c'est pour l'essentiel ce que j'ai tente' de capturer et de resoudre depuis mes premieres peintures, comme enfant, et jusqu'e mes dernieres photographies: pourquoi je ressens d'une certaine facon, certaine chose que je vois, d'ou vient ce sentiment, et comment je peux l'integrer a mon travail?

Chaque medium, chaque piece a sa facon d'etre, tout comme chaque artiste pris individuellement a sa facon d'exister; c'est la responsabilite de l'artiste de donner vie a cette problematique. C'est notre devoir d'incessamment nous pousser, ainsi que les autres, non pas seulement a chercher mais a definir une vision unique et creative qui parle pour elle-meme, et parle fort.

Continue de photographier.

Avec l'amour,
Fox Harvard.
Add a Comment:
 
:iconsolus-photography:
Solus-Photography Featured By Owner Oct 11, 2011
That's a well written piece of excellent self observation Sir.
Reply
:iconfoxharvard:
FoxHarvard Featured By Owner Oct 12, 2011  Professional Photographer
Thank you.
Reply
:iconfoxharvard:
FoxHarvard Featured By Owner Feb 13, 2011  Professional Photographer
Thank you.
Reply
:iconjohnpaulthornton:
johnpaulthornton Featured By Owner Feb 13, 2011
Engaging, intelligent, emotive and sexy stuff...
Reply
:iconjakezdaniel:
JakezDaniel Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2011   Photographer
"It is our duty to continually push ourselves and
others into not only finding, but defining a unique and creative vision
that speaks for itself, and speaks loudly"


So true and important.
Thanks for this journal, this is very instructive and interesting.

And welcome to the other dA :D
Reply
:iconduncanritchie:
DuncanRitchie Featured By Owner Feb 3, 2011
It's truly good to see you here Fox. Such an insightful run down on the man that is Fox Harvard also. It's intetesting to see that the person I envisaged behind the lens is very close to the person you are. Just goes to show that the artist CAN reach you through their work. Anyway I'll get back to you later, at the moment I'm sitting on a lighthouse balcony doing a job for the local tourism council. Between the floods and cyclones this states been having this is the first day I've had to shoot!

Take care mate!
Reply
:iconfoxharvard:
FoxHarvard Featured By Owner Feb 3, 2011  Professional Photographer
The esteemed Mr. Ritchie, esquire. :)

Good seeing you here too. I used to have a deviant account under an old email address, but made a bollocks of it & never paid much attention to it. This is intended as a more serious attempt.

Looking forward to seeing your new work.

Take care,
FH
Reply
:iconchris2balls:
Chris2Balls Featured By Owner Feb 3, 2011  Student General Artist
thanks for the background info!
i disagree about your comment on "soul" in art: "soul" in art, to me, is the transposition of one's perception of a subject. the "lack of soul" is the supposed lack of physicality of digital photography, as in one has a certain distance with the media ( as opposed to the developing process of analog etc.), different qualities... but it's absurd. there is still a man behind a camera capturing something, and this doesn't change from analog to digital. development, film grain/quality, amongst other things, are a detail. the soul is in the artist, and it shines through his work: it's not the medium that has the soul. it also depends on what effect(s) you want to obtain, but it certainly doesn't make a media "soulless".

why are women and why sexuality the prime topics of your photographic body of work?
Reply
:iconfoxharvard:
FoxHarvard Featured By Owner Feb 3, 2011  Professional Photographer
"why are women and why sexuality the prime topics of your photographic body of work?"


It's just what comes most naturally. Landscapes, architecture, etc, (in photography) bore the absolutely shit out of me.

During the last few years of shooting, my primary intention was to capture and exhibit the individual character and physicality of each person as it existed--or at least as I saw it--during a single moment. When shooting each model I wasn't trying to be conscientiously "artistic", I was merely trying to uncover the passion and intensity of each person in the way they saw fit to express it. I tried to avoid most of the banal clichés of nude & erotic photography by paying little attention to any specific style or genre, and although some shots appear editorial in nature, most are of extremely spontaneous moments without being too mindful of instruction or rules. The shots I tend to like the best are the one-offs; the unrehearsed moments in between the poses they're putting on--the moments where they let their guard down just enough to interact with me on a more personal and intimate level, as if the camera were removed from the equation.

If you're interested in reading more about how/why it's a constant in my work, check this piece out:

[link]
Reply
:iconchris2balls:
Chris2Balls Featured By Owner Feb 3, 2011  Student General Artist
thank you for your time, fox! i've read the linked text! :)
Reply
Add a Comment: